How Oral Health Impacts Overall Health

What Your Oral Health Says About Your Overall Health

You may not think that your oral health is connected to your overall health, but it can be. Your body is all connected. What is going on in your mouth can impact what is going on in the rest of your body. If there are health issues there, they can be spread elsewhere. Not only can your oral health be telling of other health issues that may potentially be going on in your body, but it can also impact the rest of your body.

If you have infections impacting your oral health, it is likely from bacteria growth. This growth or infection can spread to other parts of your body as well.

Gum disease, otherwise known ad periodontist, is an infection of the gums that is caused by poor oral hygiene. This infection has been connected to other health afflictions such as diabetes and HIV/AIDS.

As the body is fighting off oral infections, it can also lower the body’s resistance to fight other potential infections and leave you vulnerable to many unwanted conditions.  

Conditions Linked with Oral Health

There are many medical conditions that have been linked with your oral hygiene. Poor oral health can contribute to these health conditions:

  • Endocarditis—this infection of the inner lining of your heart, occurs when bacteria or germs from another part of the body (like your mouth) spreads to your heart through your bloodstream.
  • Cardiovascular disease—heart disease and other heart related conditions such as, clogged arteries, and strokes may be linked to inflammation and infections caused by oral bacteria growth.
  • Diabetes—gum disease is more frequent in those who have diabetes. Diabetes can reduce your body’s resistance to infection, including oral infection and gum disease.
  • Osteoporosis—this condition causes bones to become weak and brittle. It can be linked with gum disease which can lead to bone loss and tooth loss.

Other conditions that have been linked to oral health include head and neck cancers, eating disorders, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjogren’s syndrome, Alzheimer’s disease, and even pregnancy and birth. Gum disease has been linked to premature birth and low birth weights.

How To Improve Your Oral Health

So how can you avoid your oral health from affecting your overall health? Improve your oral health. Keep your mouth healthy and avoid infection starting at all. Good oral practices include brushing at least twice daily. Flossing your teeth at least once a day. Use fluoride in your oral care. Look for toothpaste with fluoride. Be sure to visit your dentist about every six months for a semi-annual cleaning. This is also a great way to work fluoride into your oral care. You should also replace your toothbrush every 3-4 months. As the bristles wear down, they will be less effective in removing plaque from your mouth. You should also avoid tobacco to ensure better oral health.